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Journal

Texas A&M University, 249 Blocker Hall, 4212 TAMU, College Station, Texas 77843-4212

Callaloo provides a publication outlet, in English or English translations, for new, emerging, and established creative writers who produce texts in different languages in the African Diaspora. It also serves as a forum for literary and cultural critics who write about the literature and culture of the African Diaspora.

Callaloo is an academic quarterly. It also sponsors a number of related projects like on-campus readings lectures, symposia; an annual international creative writing workshop in fiction and poetry writing; and an annual conference.

Callaloo
(979) 458-3108
(979) 458-3275
P. O. Box 2895-00100 Nairobi Kenya

Kwani? is a journal founded by some of Kenya’s most exciting new writers and has 6 print editions to date. Receives significant funding from the Ford Foundation and has become a major platform for writing from across the African continent.

Established in 2003, Kwani Trust is a Kenyan based literary network dedicated to developing quality creative writing and committed to the growth of the creative industry through the publishing and distribution of contemporary African writing, offering training opportunities, producing literary events and establishing and maintaining global literary networks.

Kwani?
Tel: +254 (0) 20 444 1801 | Cell: +254 (0) 704 832 379
+254 020 4441802

Aims to provide a robust virtual home for culture lovers and to remain the leading South African multicultural online journal. It accommodates other languages such as Xhosa, English and Dutch.  LitNet is a home for both the home-grown philosopher and the more highbrow intellectual.

LitNet
021 886 5169
Matatu

Matatu is a journal on African literatures and societies dedicated to interdisciplinary dialogue between literary and cultural studies, historiography, the social sciences and cultural anthropology. It creates temporary communicative communities and provides a transient site for the exchange of news, storytelling, and political debate.
Matatu is animated by a lively interest in African culture and literature (including the Afro-Caribbean) that moves beyond worn-out clichés of “cultural authenticity” and “national liberation” towards critical exploration of African modernities. The East African public transport vehicle from which Matatu takes its name is both a component and a symbol of these modernities: based on “Western” (these days usually Japanese) technology, it is a vigorously African institution; it is usually regarded with some anxiety by those travelling in it, but is often enough the only means of transport available; it creates temporary communicative communities and provides a transient site for the exchange of news, storytelling, and political debate.
Matatu is firmly committed to supporting democratic change in Africa, to providing a forum for interchanges between African and European critical debates, to overcoming notions of absolute cultural, ethnic, or religious alterity, and to promoting transnational discussion on the future of African societies in a wider world.

Edited by Gordon Collier, Geoffrey V. Davis, Christine Matzke, Aderemi Raji-Oyelade, Wanjiku wa Ngugi, Ezenwa–Ohaeto† and Frank Schulze–Engler

Matatu